How to find the perfect hat | Goorin Bros. Hat Shop

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#1 What’s the best shape for me?

Hats are like love. There’s a hat out there for everyone…and once you find it, you’ll know.

We’re good at playing matchmaker. We want to help you find the perfect hat.

If you’re looking for a little hat love, read this guide to get started. We’ll walk you through the basics. Or just come into one of our hat shops and we’ll take it from there.

diamond-shaped face

diamond_maleWidest at the cheekbones, your face is highly angular, with a narrow forehead and a tapered chin. A moderate to wide brim with a pinched crown may be the best hat style for you.

Wide Brim Fedora with Pinched Crown
Moderate Brim Fedora with Pinched Crown
Six Panel Flat Cap

oblong face

oblong_maleAn oblong face is longer than it is wide, with fairly straight lines running from temple to jaw, and a round chin.

Try hats with a flared brim like wide brim fedoras, or hats like newsboys and cloches that sit low on the forehead. Avoid hats with narrow or flat brims, as these will overemphasize the long lines of your face.

Stingy Brim Fedora
Oblong Male Top Hat
Top Hat
Halo Ivy

round face

round_maleYour face is about as wide as it is long, with a wide forehead, full cheeks, and a rounded chin.

Try balancing out this face shape with a more angular hat. Because your face is very symmetrical, you can easily wear asymmetrical shapes, such as hats with a high crown and peaked or slanted brim. You can further accentuate this effect by slanting your hat forward. Avoid tall rounded crowns or wide crowns and brims, which will accentuate the roundness of your face.

Wide Brim Teardrop Top Fedora
Stingy Brim Fedora
Gatsby

square face

square_maleA square face has a strong jawline, a wide forehead, and wide cheekbones.

If you’ve got a square face, soft designs like floppy hats or curvy lines like bowlers will be especially flattering for you.

Diamond Top Fedora
Porkpie
Halo Ivy

diamond-shaped face

diamond_femaleWidest at the cheekbones, your face is highly angular, with a narrow forehead and a tapered chin. A moderate to wide brim with a pinched crown may be the best hat style for you.

Wide Brim Fedora with Pinched Crown
Moderate Brim Fedora with Pinched Crown
Asymmetrical Fedora

oblong face

oblong_femaleAn oblong face is longer than it is wide, with fairly straight lines running from temple to jaw, and a round chin.

Try hats with a flared brim like wide brim fedoras, or hats like newsboys and cloches that sit low on the forehead. Avoid hats with narrow or flat brims, as these will overemphasize the long lines of your face.

Moderate Brim Fedora
Stingy Brim Fedora
Gatsby

round face

round_femaleYour face is about as wide as it is long, with a wide forehead, full cheeks, and a rounded chin.

Try balancing out this face shape with a more angular hat. Because your face is very symmetrical, you can easily wear asymmetrical shapes, such as hats with a high crown and peaked or slanted brim. You can further accentuate this effect by slanting your hat forward. Avoid tall rounded crowns or wide crowns and brims, which will accentuate the roundness of your face.

Cloche with Asymmetrical Brim
Sun Hat
Wide Brim Fedora with Pinched Crown

square face

square_femaleA square face has a strong jawline, a wide forehead, and wide cheekbones.

Soft designs like floppy hats or curvy lines like bowlers are especially flattering to a square face.

Schoolboy
Sun Hat
Cabbie

#2 What’s my hat size?

Everyone knows their shoe size. Hats? Not so much. But with a few quick measurements, you will know your hat size which, unlike your waist size, will stay the same for the rest of your life.

Method A: Measuring tape

Simply measure the circumference of your head in inches or centimeters, holding the tape or string snug, but not too tight, just above your ears – which is right about where your hat will sit. The job is made easier if you can recruit the neighbor or a friendly cop to take the measurements for you. If none is available, use a mirror and measure several times to ensure accuracy. Then consult the chart below to determine your equivalent size.

Method B: String

No measuring tape? No problem. Cut a 30″ piece of string. Use the string to measure your head, then measure the length of string used.

Adult Sizes

XS S M L XL XXL
Centimeters 54 55.5 57 59 61 63
Inches 21 1/4 21 5/8 22 1/2 23 1/4 24 24 7/8
UK Hat Sizes 5/8 3/4 7 1/4 1/2 3/4
USA Hat Sizes 3/4 7/8 1/8 3/8 5/8 7 7/8

Kid Sizes

Small/Medium Medium/Large One Size (OS)
Centimeters 50   -  52  52   -  54  50   -  54 
Inches 19 5/8  -  20 1/2 20 1/2  -  21 1/4 19 5/8  -  21 1/4

#3 Make it your own

Here’s how some of our favorite style influencers are wearing their Goorin Bros. hats.

How do you wear yours? Show us on Instagram with #itsagoorin.

 

Make a statement without saying a word.

Straw Fedora

The contrast of a straw fedora with a casual black outfit is a refreshing choice, especially when paired with a casual shoe. @brandon_faber is wearing our Snare.

Straw Floppy

Sometimes it’s all about the accents. @themostsincere could not be any more glamorous in our Mrs. Franklin.

Cloche

Big hoop earrings + a cloche = such a cute look. This is our Beverly Corleone, which is an ultra-flattering shape that’s perfect for fall.

Fedora

Elevate a casual outfit with a statement hat. Our County Line is the perfect choice here. @rdotmirza

Boater

Our Susan Brown is a classic shape infused with a modern color; the result is a unique hat that makes a statement. @joellegrace is rocking it.

#4 Glossary

Acrylic

A synthetic fiber invented in 1941 that resembles wool. It is made of a polymer and can be used to imitate cotton and cashmere. As it is synthetic, it is hypoallergenic and machine washable. Care: spot clean with soap and water; iron warm as needed.

Alpaca

Similar to sheep’s wool but hypoallergenic, this fiber comes from the alpaca, a South American animal similar to a llama. The fiber is soft, durable, water-resistant and reflects solar radiation. Our alpaca products are made from imported Peruvian alpaca fleece. Care: same as wool.

Angora

A very soft and fluffy fur from Angora rabbits. Angora is much lighter and warmer than wool because the core of the fiber is hollow. Since the hair is extremely fine, it can felt unintentionally from even light use and become overly warm. Matting will occur on the rabbit’s fur if it is not sheared, so harvesting it for wool is the humane choice. Care: same as wool, though clean very gently so as not to cause fibers to mat.

BU

BU is the measurement of weaves in a woven straw. The lower the BU number, the tighter the weave in the paper straw, thus making it a higher quality.

Beret

A soft, wide, circular cap made from felt, felted jersey or fabric, sure to give the wearer an air of intelligence and timeless style. Très chic!

Boiled Wool

Knit or woven wool that has been shrunk 20-35% by washing it in very hot water. The process creates a textile that is similar to felt in texture but is warmer and stronger, since shrinking the fabric tightens the fibers and traps air pockets that provide insulation. It is naturally water-resistant and stain-resistant. Care: same as wool.

Brim

The projecting edge of a hat, sometimes called a peak. Keep it low down for that air of mystery or up a bit higher for unmistakable confidence.

Baseball cap

A paneled cloth cap with a brim. The heroes of America’s pastime made it famous in the early 1900s, and fans soon brought it off the field to make it the most popular casual style.

Blocking

The process by which most felt and straw hats are made. A hood (unshaped cone of material) is heated and pulled very tightly over a wooden or aluminum mold. After cooling, the hat is taken off the block and finished. And voila – the magic of hatmaking turns shapeless into stylish.

Bonnet

A large headdress with a deep brim and ribbons to tie under the chin. Think Pride & Prejudice and you’ll have the right idea.

Brisa weave (BREE-sah)

A basket-type weave used for Panama hats. This highly efficient method makes for an extra-breathable hat, the perfect choice for long hours in the sunshine.

Beanie

A tight-fitting, casual knit cap that’s cozy and protects from cold. The Canucks call it a tuque.

Boater

A flat-topped hat with a small flat brim, traditionally made of stiffened straw. Some call it a skimmer, but by any name this hat will always be the quintessential summer style.

Bowler

An oval hat with a round, rigid crown and a small, curved brim. If you’re stateside, be sure to call it a derby – bowlers are strictly British.

Broadcloth

A thick, soft, often felted fabric traditionally made of wool. It has a dense weave that lends sturdiness regardless of the original material.

CHAMBRAY

(SHAM-bray) A cotton shirting fabric that looks like a denim but is light-weight. It features a plain, balanced weave using white threads across a color warp. Chambray was originally the fabric choice for the workingman’s blue shirt, hence the term blue-collar worker.

Cloche

From the French for “bell”, a close-fitting hat featuring a round crown and either no brim or a narrow, flared one. Originating in the 1920s, it was so popular it could be found atop the flapper and the temperance campaigner alike.

Crown

The top part of a hat. It should be comfortably snug without fitting too tight – a headache is no one’s friend.

Cap

A hat with a small brim at the front. It could be an ivy, a Gatsby or a baseball – however you wear it, a cap is the perfect everyday choice.

Corduroy

Essentially a rigid version of velvet, corduroy is a twisted fabric that can be made from almost any fiber. Its weaving process incorporates additional fabric to existing cloth, which makes the finished product very strong. The ridges in corduroy are called wales.

Cut & sew

Hats sewn together from pieces of fabric using an existing pattern. Cut & sew describes most hats that aren’t created using blocking.

Cashmere

Luxury wool obtained from Cashmere and other types of goats. It is very lightweight, strong, warm and soft. British rule of Kashmir (the fabric’s main producer) from 1846-1947 popularized the fabric worldwide, and their misspelling of the region’s name gave the textile its title. Care: allowing cashmere to air out between wearings prevents the need for regular cleaning. If stains occur, try brushing in the direction of the nap, then gently blotting with mild soap and water with a light-colored clean cloth. Never rub at stains or wring the item. When finished, reshape and then lay flat to air dry.

Cowboy hat

A fedora-style hat with a high crown and wide brim originally worn by cowhands in the American West.

Cut & sew

Hats sewn together from pieces of fabric using an existing pattern. Cut & sew describes most hats that aren’t created using blocking.

Donegal Tweed

Very high quality tweed created by home weavers in County Donegal, Ireland. The Donegal tradition of hand-woven fabric dates back to the late 18th century, and the skill has been passed down through generations. The wool used for Donegal comes from local flocks of sheep, and dyes are distilled from plants native to the area. Care: allowing tweed to air out between wearings prevents the need for regular cleaning. If stains occur, try brushing in the direction of the nap, then gently blotting with mild soap and water with a light-colored clean cloth. Never rub at stains or wring the item. When finished, reshape and then lay flat to air dry.

Fascinator

An elaborately trimmed hair decoration on a band, clip or comb. Slip one on to fit right in with British royalty at the Royal Ascot horse races.

Felted Wool

Raw wool that has been drenched in soapy water and agitated into a firm mat. Since wool hairs are made up of scales, this process loosens and then locks together scales from individual hairs to create a thick, strong, nonwoven material. The fabric has been used for centuries; it was likely discovered when raw wool placed in shoes to prevent blisters turned into felt naturally through the sweat and agitation of heavy walking. Care: same as wool.

Fedora

A brimmed hat with a tapered crown dented down the top. Named after the lead character in Victorien Sardou’s 1882 drama Fedora, it has remained the Western world’s favorite shape since its debut.

Felt

Cloth made from wool, fur or hair, compacted (felted) by rolling and pressing in the presence of heat and moisture.

GINGHAM

A printed or dyed fabric that is known for its checked patterns of white and a bold color. It is traditionally made of medium weight cotton.

Glen check

Often called Prince of Wales check, glen check was created for country wear by English nobles in Scotland who lacked a family tartan (see plaid). Named after the valley of Glenurquhart in Inverness-shire, Scotland.

Grosgrain (GROW-grain)

Strong, heavy corded fabric characterized by its ribbed appearance. It is made from wool, silk, or a combination of fibers and is most commonly used for ribbon – including the fine bands on many of our styles.

Herringbone

A V-shaped twill weaving pattern that forms the appearance of a broken zigzag and is most commonly used in suiting.

Houndstooth

A two-tone textile pattern of broken checks or abstract four-pointed shapes. It originated in the Scottish Lowlands but is popular worldwide. The traditional houndstooth weave is very strong.

LINEN

A fabric woven out of natural fibers taken from the stalk of the flax plant. Linen is considered to be up to 3 times stronger and more lustrous than other natural fibers such as cotton. It is also very cool and absorbent, making it a highly valued fabric during hot weather.

Lambs wool

Soft, slippery wool produced from a lamb’s first shearing. Care: allowing lambswool to air out between wearings prevents the need for regular cleaning. If stains occur, try brushing in the direction of the nap, then gently blotting with mild soap and water with a light-colored clean cloth. Never rub at stains or wring the item. When finished, reshape and then lay flat to air dry.

Leather

Tanned animal hide, most commonly from cows. Leather is flexible and durable and will behave differently over time depending on the grain type: full grain will develop a patina, whereas other types will not develop a patina but are more stain-resistant. Care: treat yearly with a protective coating. Spot clean with soap and water or a cloth dipped in vinegar. Care: Air dry.

Merino wool

Wool from the hair of a Merino sheep, prized for its softness, strength and warmth. It wicks moisture off the skin and regulates body temperature better than most other wools, making it ideal for athletic and outdoor wear. Merino sheep are primarily found in Australia and New Zealand.

Millinery

The craft of making hats, refined into an art form through hundreds of years of feathers, frills and felting.

Mohair

One of the oldest textiles in use, dating back to 8th century England, mohair comes from Angora goats (not to be confused with angora, the fur from angora rabbits). It is silky, strong, and a good insulator. South Africa is the world’s largest mohair producer, with the US coming in second.

PINSTRIPE

A fabric with very thin stripes, often used for suits.

Plaid

A pattern of woven cloth consisting of crossed horizontal and vertical bands of varying widths in two or more colors. Tartan is the most common type and originated in Scotland, where families or clans traditionally had their own unique plaid pattern; tartans are woven into a plaid pattern. Gingham consists of an even square check of white and a bold color, usually on medium- to light-weight cotton. Madras is a printed plaid used primarily in summer fabrics and uses deeply saturated or bright colors.

Panama hat

Panama hat
A straw hat hand-woven in Ecuador from paja toquilla (toquilla straw). The craft of making Panamas has been passed down through generations for centuries.

Pillbox

A small brimless hat with high, flat sides and a circular shape. It debuted in the 1910s but it hits stride in the 1950s. Did someone say Jackie O?

RIBBON STRAW

Ribbon refers to a type of weave that is braided, commonly found in straw hats.

Raffia

Natural straw from Madagascar sourced from the raffia palm, which has the biggest leaves of any palm variety.

SEERSUCKER

Woven fabric with a permanent pucker that is traditionally cotton, but can also be polyester. It is most often a stripe pattern and is used for summer sportswear.

SINAMAY

A straw made from banana plant fibers called Abaca, grown in the Philippines. It comes in two forms, flat sheet and loosely woven hoods. Sheet sinamay hats are made from a number of layers and are blocked using the same method as fabric covered hats. Woven hoods are blocked using traditional metal pans.

Schoolboy

A paneled cloth cap originating in elite British schools, now a casual and stylish alternative to the flat cap or cadet.

SENNIT STRAW

Braided cordage formed by plaiting several strands of rape fiber or similar material. Plaited straw, grass, or palm leaves are used for making hats.

SISAL STRAW

A type of high quality straw made up of strong fiber used in making hats. It is delicate in texture but resilient in wear, and takes dye well. Sisal is a Mexican and Central American plant from the Agave Sislana species.

Shearling/sheepskin

A sheep pelt that has been sheared to a uniform length and then tanned, giving one side a leather or suede finish and leaving the other with a soft, dense fur. Care:llowing shearling to air out between wearings prevents the need for regular cleaning. If stains occur, try brushing in the direction of the nap, then gently blotting with mild soap and water with a light-colored clean cloth. Never rub at stains or wring the item. When finished, reshape and then lay flat to air dry.

SHANTUNG STRAW

Durable and lightweight high performance man-made paper rolled into a yarn to imitate straw. Perfected by Korean Buddhist monks in Japan around 600 CE, it became a popular hat material when the paja toquilla traditionally used for Panamas became scarce in the mid-1900s. It was originally called washi (literally meaning “Japanese paper”), but hat manufacturers renamed it to make it more consumer-friendly. Its most amazing characteristic is that it can absorb thirty percent moisture without having the feeling of wetness. It has high tear strength and is considered to be the strongest of all natural fibers, which makes it great for making hats. It is very similar looking to genuine Panama hats.

Satin

A weave typically made from silk, rayon, or nylon with one glossy, slippery side and one matte side. Satin derives its name from the Chinese port city of Quanzhou, called Zayton by Medieval Arabic traders. Care: Wash by hand in cold water with a gentle detergent.

Suede

Leather with a napped finish. While suede is softer and more pliable than standard leather, it is very susceptible to dirt and water damage and can lose color over time. Care: same as leather, and use a suede brush to remove surface damage and maintain the finish.

TOQUILLA STRAW

Panama hats are made from a special straw, called toquilla in Spanish.  This straw is native to Ecuador. 95% of Panama hats are made in Ecuador because this straw cannot be found elsewhere. A distinctive feature of Toquilla is that it cannot be woven by machine, thus is always woven by hand, making each Panama hat unique.

TOYO RIBBON STRAW

A shiny smooth material made chiefly in Japan from shellacked rice paper and used especially
for straw hats.

Top hat

A tall cylindrical hat with a narrow brim and the most popular among gentlemen of every sort until the bowler supplanted it in the late 1800s.

Velvet

A type of tufted weave that results in a lush, dense pile finish on one side of the fabric. Velvet can be made of silk, cotton, synthetics or a blend of fibers. The name comes from the French velu, meaning “shaggy”.

WAXED CANVAS

Cotton impregnated with a paraffin based wax, woven in a cloth. Widely used from the mid-19th century to the mid-1950s. The product originated from the sailing industry in Scotland and became popular for its waterproofing abilities.

Woolrich tweed

Manufactured in the oldest continuously running American wool mill, Woolrich is considered the premium American tweed.

WHEAT STRAW

Wheat straw is thick and coarse and although can be dyed to color, is usually seen in its natural golden brown color. It is often used to make more affordable hats.

Wool

Wool is obtained from sheep. It is durable and a good insulator, capable of keeping heat either out or in. It can absorb up to one third its weight in water and is naturally flame resistant. Evidence of wool being used as a textile dates back to 4000 BC. People have a range of reactions to wool, from mild itching to allergic reactions. Care: allowing wool to air out between wearings prevents the need for regular cleaning. If stains occur, try brushing in the direction of the nap, then gently blotting with mild soap and water with a light-colored clean cloth. Never rub at stains or wring the item. When finished, reshape and then lay flat to air dry.